Tools

28 Mar 2012

COBAM aims to provide policymakers, practitioners and local communities with the information, analysis and tools they need to implement policies and projects for adaptation to climate change and reduction of carbon emissions in the forests of the Congo Basin, with equitable impacts and co-benefits – including poverty reduction, enhancement of ecosystem services, and protection of local livelihoods and rights.  COBAM is implemented by CIFOR under the African Development Bank grant to the Economic Community of Central African States for financing the Congo Basin Ecosystems Conservation Suppor

28 Mar 2012

A journalist's guide to the role of forests in combating global climate change' is a media pack that aims to give journalists an overview of a vital issue in global climate change negotiations which is the subject of fierce debate. This short media briefing explains how the REDD mechanism could work and explains some of the key controversies. Read more: http://www.cifor.org/nc/online-library/browse/view-publication/publicati...

23 Mar 2012

There are two main policy responses to climate change: mitigation and adaptation. Mitigation addresses the root causes, by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, while adaptation seeks to lower the risks posed by the consequences of climatic changes. Both approaches will be necessary, because even if emissions are dramatically decreased in the next decade, adaptation will still be needed to deal with the global changes that have already been set in motion.

23 Mar 2012

The Guardian is setting out to create world's best layman-friendly guide to all aspects of climate change – and we need your help. Read more: http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/series/the-ultimate-climate-change...

23 Mar 2012

Although there is widespread agreement on the need for adaptation measures to limit the risks posed by climate change, there is no clear consensus on how much adaptation will cost or how it will be paid for. A recent World Bank report suggested that the price of adaptation in developing countries alone will be $70–100 billion a year between 2010 and 2050, while other studies suggest these figures are too low.